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Fracture Frameless Print-on-Glass…Cool?

Categories: Art + Graphics, Modern Decor + Objects

Are these products cool or not cool? Genuinely asking your opinion. On the one hand, it’s kind of cool to print directly on glass. You’d be able to choose a lot of modern photos, and being able to hang directly onto the wall might make for a really streamlined, sleek composition. On the other hand, is it kind of “too trendy” to print photos directly on glass? Will it look odd not having a frame? We kind of like frames…

The glass is also claimed to be more shatter-proof than a regular glass frame and that there are no sharp edges. We could see this looking kind of cool with one of those one-giant-photos-split-into-a-bunch-of-little-photos sort of thing. More here.  What do you think? 

One Comment to "Fracture Frameless Print-on-Glass…Cool?"

  1. Actually, I do like the frameless aspect and we manufacture our entire collection at PrintedArt with frameless material as the preferred option. However, glass as a material has a number of problems:

    - it is heavy, which creates problems for hanging it in large size.

    - most importantly though, glass is not optically clear. It has a slight green tinge, which disqualifies it for being used with photography, in my opinion.

    - the color saturation of any so-called “direct to substrate” print technologies tends to be less than a traditional paper print.

    For the above reasons, most framers prefer acrylic over glass for both framing and mounting. At PrintedArt we have not yet found any technique that rivals paper prints for true-color output with strongly saturated photos. We use archival prints with pigment inks and we mount them directly onto the acrylic, which guarantees the best vibrancy and also the best long-term protection.

    A reasonable compromise material (cheap, but still relatively good quality) would be printing directly to the acrylic. Eliminating the paper saves both material and labor, but dims the colors since the saturation cannot reach the same level as with paper. But we definitely do not recommend using glass as a display for art.

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