2M Blog
2M Shop
2M Directory
2M Collective
live. learn. share. design.

Lucienne Day: colorful and whimsical

Categories: Uncategorized

Lucienne Day, a 20thcentury English
textile designer whose fabrics inspired by abstract patterns, nature
and modern art, brought the contemprorary design into everyone's
homes. I enjoy exploring Lucienne Day's design which has timeless
qualities: cheerful, doodle like, fun and fresh.

 
Lucienne-Day-fabric-001

Lucienne Day
made her name and career by Calyx, a richy colored textile design
printed with floating bizarre shapes. The inspiration for Calyx is
originated from the paintings of her favorite artists Paul Klee and
Joan Miro. She first exhibited Calyxm at the Festival of Britain in 1951. The original colorways of the design was lime yellow, vermilion,black and white, on an olive background.

  Design-happens-lucienne-day-collage600x260

Dandelion, Sequoi and Flotilla

Day-Helix
Helix,1970

One of the upcoming exhibitions at the
Textile Museum, DC, Art by the Yard:Women Design Mid-Century
Britain,
will showcase the works of the groundbreaking women's
artists after the World War II. These mid-century women artists
transformed the textile market by bold colors, motifs and inspiring
but yet affordable lines. One of the ladies, Lucienne Day, replaced
the pre-war floral design of interiors with non-representational
patterns in vivid, fresh and bold colors.

Lucienne-Day-prints

The Design Museum tells us more about Lucienne Day:

The
playfulness and linearity of her early patterns was superseded from
the late 1950s by a growing interest in architectural compositions,
as 1950s Sequoia. After a series of textural patterns during the
early 1960s, her designs became bolder, simpler and flatter, as in
1966’s Pennycress. Several of her later designs had full-width
repeats, such as 1967’s Causeway designed specifically for the
large floor-to-ceiling picture windows then in vogue.

An
inspired colourist, Lucienne was always meticulous about selecting
the colourways for her patterns. She also acted as colour consultant
to several clients. Colour relationships were the key feature of her
one-off ‘silk mosaics’, a new medium that she developed during
the late 1970s.

  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>